DR650 FAQ - Lighting & Electrical

Q:

Do you carry a high-output stator?

Do you sell a modified stator for a DR650 that would give my bike the added electrical power to support additional electric gear (pants, jacket, etc.)? If not, do you know how I can do it myself?

A:

In the stock configuration you could probably get away with powering a set of electric gloves and a jacket liner or gloves and a pair of pants. The stock system does not have enough output to support to large items like a jacket liner and pants. Though we hope to someday have a replacement high-output stator for the DR650, it is a few months away at best. However, converting your current stator from a Delta to Wye. Here are links to two different threads on ThumperTalk.com that cover the procedure. Click here to go to: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-725419.html. Click here to go to: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-851210.html

Q:

Can you tell me how to check my stator?

I have a 1991 DR650 and I was wondering if you could tell me how to check the stator to see if it is working or not?

A:

You must check it on the AC scale. It should be around 30-50 volts at around 3000-4000 rpm. If you are not getting numbers like that, it is probably not functioning correctly.

Q:

Can I install LED turnsignals?

Can I put LED turn signals on my DR650 without any modifications?

A:

No. You do need to perform some small modifications. Because the LED lights draw so little current, you need to add a resistor in the system so the flasher unit is triggered. If you are doing it for power savings, you really don't recognize any savings. Another option is to change out your flasher unit and install an LED flasher unit. This requires removing the dash indicator bulb or installing a Kuryakyn diode kit.

Q:

What do I have to do to switch all my lights to LED?

I am a fan of LED lighting because it looks so much brighter. What would I have to do to switch all my lights (turn signals and brake light) on my DR650 over to LEDs?

A:

You will need a different relay if you use LED turn signals. You will also need to remove or modify the stock turn signal indicator lamp in the DR instrument panel. If you leave the regular light bulb in place, both sides will flash at the same time.

Q:

Stop the power back feed in your LED turn indicators!

I have a piece of advice to share so that anyone else doesn't stay up all night pulling their hair out. If you decide to change your stock turn signals to LED signals here is some advice: Realize that the little indicator light on your dash is causing power to back feed wiring.

A:

You can leave the indicator light in by wiring up one of these diode kits from Kuryakin.

Q:

Why are cold days such a problem?

The electric starter on my DR650 doesn’t work too well on cold days (really cold! Like -25 C). Would a bigger wire from my battery to the relay and from the relay to the starter help the situation?

A:

The larger wire may help a bit, but better than that would be to keep your battery warm on cold days like that. Lead-acid batteries have much lower output in cold temperatures. Either take it in the house or if you don’t want to do that, wrap it in a terrarium heater for reptiles available at a pet store. Lastly, check that the battery is still good! It fully charged battery should show about 12.7 volts. (BTW – what are you doing riding in -25 C weather? You are a brave soul!)

Q:

I keep blowing out my taillight, why?

Every time I nail my DR650 off the line and wind it out real hard, it blows the rear taillight. If I start normally and get up to speed before winding it out hard, everything seems to be OK. I have been through a half-dozen at least. Do you have any idea what might be causing this?

A:

Sounds more like a vibration issue rather than a voltage problem. You can get heavier duty bulbs though I am not sure of the exact replacement numbers.

Q:

Why won't my XR250 charge the battery?

(First of all, I know this is about an XR250, but a lot of DR guys have the same type of question) I have my XR250 converted to dual sport with a DC system, but the battery doesn't stay charged. Can you explain why it won't and what I can do about it?

A:

Your stator is probably only rated for about 50 watts and that is not enough to keep a DC running properly. A typical system will use 35 watts for the headlight and 10 for the tail light. That alone is 45 watts and that leaves just 5 watts to charge the battery and it is not enough. The rectifier/regulator is not 100% efficient and it dissipates 5 to 10 watts just doing its job. Without enough juice to adequately recharge the battery, it is going to go flat pretty quickly.

If your stator is rated at 75 watts or more, you can probably successfully run a DC system. A 100 watt stator will for sure make a good DC system.

Don't give up if you have a low-output stator, there is a second option available to you! You can run a total-loss battery system. In this scenario you use your AC stator to run the headlight, tail light and brake light and then have a small battery to power the flashers and horn. The only thing is there is nothing charging said battery and you need to charge it up once a week or so to keep those things functioning properly.

Q:

Does an ignition coil often go bad?

I've got a 1993 kickstart-only DR650 that ran great until it sat for less than a week. When I tried to start it last weekend it wasn't getting any spark. I thought it might be the magneto, but I've traced the visible wires up to the ignition coil and I'm getting anywhere from 6 to 16 volts going into the coil when I kick the engine over, but no voltage coming out of the spark plug wires. The Battery was really low when I did this, but I don't know if that has anything to do with the varying voltage coming up from the magneto.

Anyway, to me this indicates that the coil's bad, but before I cough up the $125 for a new coil I was hoping someone might tell me if there's any other possibility I should check before I buy the part. I've got an original service manual but I can't make sense of the diagrams and charts in the section about testing all this stuff.

A:

Checking voltage does not tell you anything useful. About the only time we ever see a bad coil is when someone's dog has chewed the wire off. It's much more likely a pulse coil, charge coil, or CDI problem (in that order). There shop manual will have specs for checking the resistance in the stator coils. Start there.

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