DR650 FAQ - Body & Frame

Q:

Will the headlight from the 2009 model fit my 2000 model?

Will the front plastic headlight surround that is on the 2009 DR650 fit on the 2000 model? I noticed they are a little different, but I can’t tell if the headlight is the exact same just looking at it.

A:

Yes. The headlight and all the mounting hardware are identical. The newer one doesn’t let any of the headlight glare back up to my eyes and is sleeker and gives cleaner air to the chest when running without a windshield.

Q:

I'm confused. Which seats will fit with which tanks and why does it matter?

I want a better seat and a bigger tank but I keep reading (on the internet) that some seats won't work with some tanks. Set me straight!

A:

The need for a specific seat only applies to seats made by Corbin. The Corbin seats are built on a rigid seat pan. It won't flex enough to fit all tanks so Corbin makes their seat in two versions. The IMS and Acerbis tanks require the seat to flex up a bit to fit the larger fuel capacity. Clark, Safari and stock tanks don't require any additional flex from the seat. So, if you have an Acerbis 5.3 gallon tank or the IMS 4.9 gallon tank and you want a Corbin seat you will need the Corbin that is made to fit IMS. If you have a stock, Clarke or Safari tank and you want a Corbin seat you will need the Corbin seat that fits the stock tank. If your seat is stock, ProCycle/Saddlemen, Seat concepts or any custom seat built on a stock seat pan it will fit any tank.

Q:

Is the ProCycle skid plate better than the Suzuki unit?

I am looking to buy a skid plate for my 2009 DR650, is the accessory item from Suzuki strong enough?

A:

The aftermarket Suzuki skid plate is fine, if you stay upright and go over a log or two. But it offers no side protection for tip-overs, especially in the rocks. Not only is the ProCycle skid plate much better, it is also less expensive! You can also add the ProCycle Armor Plating for the engine cases to give you extra protection.

Q:

Do you have a skid plate for my 1997 DR650?

I’m looking for a skid plate for my 1997 DR650SE. Everything I find is for 1998 and up. I'm looking for one that comes up high in the front and has the side wing's that protect the side of the engine.

A:

All models from 1996 and up use the same skid plate. All ProCycle skid plates have the extended front coverage as well as the side wings to protect the sides better than the accessory item sold by Suzuki. As mentioned above, you can add the ProCycle Armor Plating for added protection.

Q:

Are there issues with the lowered pegs and the shift lever or brake pedal?

I'm very interested in your lowered pegs for the DR650, but I'm curious how you deal with lowering the brake pedal, and if you need a longer shift lever.

A:

The shift lever can be lowered by changing its position on the shift shaft. Most people feel that rotating it one tooth works great. It doesn’t need to be any longer. The brake pedal height can be changed by turning the adjuster in the linkage under the master cylinder. You may have to grind a small amount off of the end of the adjuster bolt to give clearance at the brake pedal connection, but that is easily done. The peg kit comes with installation instructions and a longer spring for the brake light switch.

Q:

Are there clearance issues with skid plates and SW Motech centerstand?

Are there any conflicts with the SW Motech centerstand and the ProCycle skid plate?

A:

There are no conflicts between any skid plates and the SW Motech centerstand as they really don’t occupy the same space.

Q:

More SW Motech Centerstand questions

Are there any issues with the SW Motech Centerstand? I had a German stand on my old KLR and it was pretty awful, almost not better than no stand at all. Will the tires clear the floor when the DR is up on it? Is the effort to put the bike on the stand reasonable? Does the center stand hit the side stand? Thanks a ton for your time.

A:

If your DR suspension is in the standard ‘tall’ position the stand will just barely get the rear tire just off the ground. Maybe ½" to ¾". It depends on what tire you are running. If you have a Dunlop D606 on an 18" rim you will have to put a block under the stand. It won’t take much effort to get it onto the stand. If your DR has the suspension in the lowered position, the stand will get the rear wheel about 2" off the ground. The effort will be significantly more because you will be moving the weight of the bike higher off the ground.

The actual ground clearance and effort required will vary depending on the size of the tires on your particular bike and how much sag is adjusted into your suspension.

Some folks have reported that the side stand can rub the centerstand when they are both in the up position. As far as I can tell this seems to be more likely related to wear in the side stand pivot than anything to do with the centerstand itself. None of the DR650s around here have this issue so I haven’t seen a rubbing side stand up close.

Q:

Where do I hook up the vacuum line on the IMS tank?

I just got my IMS tank and I need to know where I plug the vacuum line that was attached to the stock petcock? Do I take the line off and use something to plug/cap at the carb, if so what? I read that you used the stock petcock, how did that go?

A:

Anything to block off the vacuum from the carb will work. You can get a small rubber 'vacuum cap' at any good auto parts store. Lots of folks just cut the hose short and push a small ball bearing into the hose to plug it up.

In order to use the stock petcock you have to enlarge the hole for the stand pipe into an oval to accommodate the two (2) standpipes from the stock petcock. You may also have to cut a small notch out of one of the fins on the cylinder head. If you decide to do this, run with the IMS petcock for a couple of months first. The IMS tank will change shape from engine heat and the weight of the fuel. If it is given a chance to 'relax' you won't need to trim as much from the fin.

Q:

Why do other petcocks have to have the fuel turned off?

I want to replace the leaking vacuum style petcock. Your replacement manual petcocks say "must be turned off if the bike sits for more than a few hours". Why is this? Does this carburetor have something that allows the fuel to not be shut off at the floats or something?

A:

In a perfect world the float valve will stop the flow of fuel into the carburetor except for when the carburetor needs more. Most of the time you can get away with forgetting to turn the fuel off, but if the float valve leaks, even just a little, all the fuel in the tank could end up in the engine crankcase mixed with the oil, and/or all over the floor of the garage. That’s bad news for your engine and of course a fire hazard. This is the reason the stock petcock is vacuum operated. It shuts the fuel off for you every time the motor is shut off.

Q:

Is the lowered footpeg kit too low for off-road?

I would like to order your lowered footpeg kit but was wondering about snagging my feet when riding off-road.

A:

Just like almost everything about dual sport riding, the lowered pegs are a compromise. If you ride a lot of single track with big rocks and stumps then the lower pegs are probably not the right choice for you. If you spend your time on paved, gravel, and jeep trails then the lower pegs might be just the ticket.

Here is a recent review from an actual client,
"Just took my first ride with the lowered pegs. Best thing I ever did. Install was easy and quality was top notch. If you feel crunched up you must buy these. The bike is more comfortable and easier to control. I also realized how much the rubber mount stockers take away from handling and feedback from the bike. With the stock pegs pressure from your foot moves the pegs, with the solid mounts pressure from your foot moves the bike. I was thinking of selling my DR650 because my other bike was a much better fit, but now with these pegs I’m keeping it! My big feet with boots now operate the bike easily. Another benefit is that now the stock handlebars feel perfect, no need to change them or add a riser kit!"
Even though this rider felt he didn't need the riser kit, that might still help give you more upper body room.

Another satisfied customer stated,
"The biggest bonus for me is that the lowered peg position has made the stock seat not nearly as irritating as it once was. Been riding longer and farther without discomfort. Love it!"

Once you install the pegs, all you need to do is adjust the shift lever and the brake lever and you are ready for those long rides. We even include a longer spring for the brake light switch should you need it.

Q:

Will the IMS tank work with the stock seat and are there tank decals for it?

I would like to purchase the IMS 4.9 gallon fuel tank, but want to know if the stock seat will fit that large a tank? Also, do you (or anybody else you know of) offer a graphics kit for that tank?

A:

Yes, the stock seat will work with any tank. As for decals, I have not yet found any decals that will stay on the IMS tank for longer than a few months. All that I have tried tend to bubble and start to peel after just a month or so. Sorry!

Q:

Corbin vs. Sargent Seats

Which seat is better for the DR650SE, the Corbin or Sargent? What's the weight difference?

A:

"Better" is a relative term. Both seats are a huge improvement over the stock torture device. The Sargent is a few pounds lighter than the Corbin, but the Corbin, while being a bit heavier is built like a tank and will likely outlast the motorcycle. While the Sargent is definitely well made it doesn't give that bulletproof impression like the Corbin does. The Sargent is a bit narrower in front which is nice when standing on the pegs. The Corbin feels wide between the knees when you are up on the pegs. Being narrower up front the Sargent doesn't give you as much support if you tend to sit more toward the front of the seat. I have a Corbin on my own bike and like it very much.

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